Posts Tagged ‘insurance planning’

4 Things You Can Do to Minimize Water Damage Repairs

Wednesday, August 14th, 2013

trouble free water damage repairWhen water damages your home, one thing is certain: your insurance company and the process of filing a claim will suddenly be a big part of your life. Here are some tips for making sure your experience is as trouble-free as possible. Create a home inventory—and make it easy on yourself A home inventory will not only ensure all your possessions are accounted for and you get proper compensation for them, it will probably speed up the claim process. Instead of depending on an insurance adjuster or your memory to provide specific details about your valuable possessions, like models and serial numbers, you can provide your insurer with a detailed list of items and an idea of their purchase price and condition. Even better, use online file storage to easily create and manage your home inventory. Backup and cloud storage technology like Carbonite, Mozy and Google Drive make keeping a proper home inventory easier and more reliable than ever before. It saves the data online where you can access it from your computer or phone, and you can save your list of possessions along with photos of each one. Go through each room in your home systematically, taking photos of your possessions with your smart phone or digital camera as you go. If you have receipts, scan them or take photos of them. After a water damage incident, you'll be able to retrieve them all and forward them to your insurance underwriter. You won't need to rely solely on your memory at a stressful time or deal with a paper inventory which may itself have water damage. Choose your water damage restoration company ahead of time Depending on the laws in your state, your insurance agent may be prohibited from recommending a specific company to repair your water damage. However, they can likely provide your with names and numbers of reputable disaster repair contractors. It's best to choose a company carefully while you're stress-free. Check their references and capabilities carefully and ask if they have an emergency response program, which puts you at the top of the priority list in the event of a problem. Know the exceptions in your insurance policy Coverage of water damage varies widely from policy to policy, so be certain you know exactly what's covered. If you don't like what you find, get in touch with your agent immediately and see if it can be changed with a rider or by moving to a different type of policy. Also, remember that natural flooding will not be covered under your homeowner policy, so flood insurance must be purchased separately. When you consider the cost of potentially extensive repairs to your home, or even replacing it completely, the few hundred dollars per year you'll pay for most flood insurance policies is a minor cost. Take protective actions as soon as possible after an incident Insurance claims are sometimes denied because the homeowner did not engage in "mitigation of loss." In other words, your insurer will expect you to take any action you can to minimize the damage to your home. Do whatever you can safely do to prevent more water from entering the affected area and/or reduce ongoing damage. For example, if you need to board up a section of damaged roof or have an area pumped out, do so and keep track of the cost so your insurer can reimburse you. With a little preparation and care, you can deal with your insurer with very little stress and much success. LDR Cleaning and Restoration is one of the premier restoration companies in Rockford, Illinois and Southern Wisconsin. LDR provides restoration services from water damage, mold removal, fire damage restoration, storm and hail damage repair for commercial and residential properties. Capable of handling any size loss and working with all types of insurance providers, the LDR disaster team is available 24 hours a day, 365 days per year. Click here to contact LDR, or call 1-888-874-7066. Image courtesy of cooldesign / FreeDigitalPhotos.net download the free Emergency Response Plan guide.  


 

How to Minimize Property Damage by Planning for Flood

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

flood damage repairFlooding is the most common disaster in the United States, one that virtually every community deals with at one time or another. How you approach it can not only make the difference between life and death, but make a great difference in how quickly your life returns to normal. Let's review some actions you can take to prepare for a flood event, ride it out successfully and experience a smoother recovery when it's all over.

Before the flood

Make sure you're familiar with the terrain around your home or business. You may be high on a hill, but are you on a slope that may experience flash flooding? Do you live in an area that hasn't flooded in decades, but could flood under the right conditions? What is the best evacuation route? What in the surrounding area will help or hinder you if you need to evacuate? Be aware of outlets your local government and media will use to warn you of possible flooding. Make sure you'll be able to follow these outlets even if you've lost power or are away from your home or business. Make a disaster plan and involve everyone at your location. LDR offers two free manuals on how to make a disaster plan for your home and business. As part of your plan, choose a restoration company in advance that comes recommended and has plenty of expertise in water damage remediation. This will save you from having to choose a company under stress later. As part of your plan, prepare a getaway bag to use if you evacuate. Full details on what to include in the bag are in our free guide Plan, Prepare and Pass the Test. Pre-pack it in a sturdy duffel-type bag and store it in a place where you can get it quickly. Make sure you include some cash, important personal information (such as medical insurance numbers) and a sleeping bag or blankets. Place a local map in your getaway bag and in your vehicle. Make sure you have a full tank of gas.

During the flood

Monitor media and government sources and pay close attention to any announcements, especially if you're ordered to evacuate. Authorities may instruct you to take (or avoid) certain routes out of the flood zone. If you're able to do so safely, turn off the power to your house at the main electrical breaker before evacuating. Exercise great caution if you must cross flood waters. If you're on foot, don't go through running water if you can avoid it; flowing water as shallow as six inches can knock you down. Remember that any water you encounter might be contaminated. If you're driving and encounter a blocked road, don't risk crossing it, especially if the water is flowing. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has found that 39% of those killed in floods were driving. No matter what, remain calm and follow common sense. If in doubt, stay put.

After the flood

If you had to evacuate your home, do not re-enter it until authorities say it's safe. Even after that, be careful of areas that may have been weakened by the floodwaters. Guard against infection and contamination. Chemicals or biological contaminants may have been carried into your home and wet areas are excellent for growing mold and bacteria. Don't drink from household taps until you're certain the water is safe, and if you have a well, have it checked by a well contractor or local health authorities. Contact your insurance company and your restoration company as soon as you can. Follow your insurance company's instructions carefully to ensure your claim process goes as smoothly as possible. LDR Cleaning and Restoration is one of the premier restoration companies in Rockford, Illinois and Southern Wisconsin. LDR provides restoration services from water damage, mold removal, fire damage restoration, storm and hail damage repair for commercial and residential properties. Capable of handling any size loss and working with all types of insurance providers, the LDR disaster team is available 24 hours a day, 365 days per year. Click here to contact LDR, or call 1-888-874-7066. Download your free home disaster planning eBook  


 

6 Reasons Why Immediate Disaster Response Is Key

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

business emergency response planWhen damage from disaster strikes your business, it can take many forms: Fire (and the water damage that results from fighting it), smoke damage, flooding from nature, accidental discharge of a sprinkler system, chemical spills, tornadoes and other severe winds, storm surge, burst pipes, roof leaks, sewage backup, vandalism—even an overflowing toilet. As the old business mantra goes, “time is money.” Every hour your business is closed because of an emergency is lost revenue. In fact, 25% of businesses that close because of a disaster never reopen. And 80% of businesses that do not recover within one month after a disaster close their doors for good. If you have not considered an emergency response plan for your business, you're rolling the dice. But no matter what the damage or its source, speed is your friend to getting back up and open for business. Here are 6 reasons why:
  1. Your insurance policy probably requires that you take as much action as possible as early as possible to secure your property from further damage. If you fail to do so, they may not cover some claims.
  2. Water itself is an emergency. It can compromise structural components such as drywall, insulation, flooring and even ceilings to the point that it might be necessary to remove them, especially if it's left more than 24 hours.
  3. If water is addressed within 8-16 hours it can be dried with very minimal structural damage. This will save you repair costs and time as well as reducing the inconvenience for your employees or tenants.
  4. Dealing with the water in 12 hours or less can reduce your drying time by a whole day and reduce structural damage further.
  5. Significant mold growth can occur in any water-damaged area not dried and repaired within 72 hours, adding time and cost to your total cleanup.
  6. As previously mentioned, the longer your location is closed, the greater the chance it will be closed permanently.
You can't predict when disaster will strike your commercial property, but you can make sure you're ready for it when does. Lost time reduces your bottom line and can end your business. Getting your business back to pre-loss condition as quickly as possible can make all the difference. Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net download the free Emergency Response Plan guide.  


 

Cloud File Storage: Out of Sight, Peace of Mind

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

cloud computingInbox overflowing with client and vendor contracts. Cardboard boxes stuffed with several years of tax statements. Hard drives maxed out with copies of projects, historical data and daily correspondence. In the day-to-day business of life, some stuff needs to be kept within arm’s reach, no question. Other items are rarely used but take up valuable space because they may be needed…someday. Whether storage is an issue at work or at home, one thing is clear: Important paperwork and electronic files should be safeguarded from worst-case scenarios such as fire, flood and the inevitable computer crash. According to Emergency Preparedness: It’s Your Business, one option is off-site storage using a Web-based file-hosting service where important information will remain secure, yet easily accessible.

Why Cloud Storage is a New Take on Emergency Preparedness

Online file storage, like Dropbox and Google Drive, and cloud backup services like Backblaze and Carbonite, is rapidly gaining popularity and replacing traditional backup drives, discs and even the trusty ol’ fireproof safe. In fact, Gartner, Inc. (a leading information technology research company) predicts that by 2016, a third of consumers’ digital content will be stored in “the cloud.” What is this mysterious cloud? Well, the technical mumbo-jumbo could fill up pages, but for our purposes, Campus Technology suggests thinking of cloud computing as a utility. Through an Internet connection, you can store data—files, photos, music, applications and more—in the cloud and access or share them anytime, anywhere, using any device. Pretty handy, huh? Once you’re on board with the concept of online file storage, deciding how to proceed can be a bit confusing due to the sheer number of service options out there. Business managers and homeowners need to weigh their choices and select a service that best fits their needs. Security is, of course, a top consideration, along with cost and special features such as file synchronization for automatic updates. Then, once you’ve selected a service, there’s the task of organizing your existing electronic files and scanning hardcopies of documents to create new files. To make this process fast and easy, there are apps (such as “Handy Scanner Free”) that allow you to scan a document using your smart phone, instantly create a PDF and upload it. So, what types of data should be scanned, saved as electronic files and stored online? Here’s a checklist for starters:
  • Insurance policies
  • Personnel files
  • Tax statements (last three years)
  • Bank account records
  • Client and vendor contracts
  • Building plans
  • Office lease
  • Mortgage paperwork
  • Important projects and proofs
  • Family photos and memorabilia
  • Credit card information
  • Photographs of valuables
Hold up: photos of valuables? You bet. The philosophy behind emergency preparedness is to help you get on with life as quickly as possible. In the event of a disaster such as a fire, for example, photographic inventories of your investments in the workplace (computers, copy machines, office furniture and so forth) as well as big-ticket items in the home (jewelry, electronics, antiques and such) can speed up the processing of your insurance claim. Simply grab your smart phone, snap away, and upload the images to that big, fluffy storage space in the sky. LDR Construction Services, Inc. Cleaning & Restoration has proudly served all of northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin since 1991. LDR specializes in the complete repair of fire, smoke, wind, water and vandalism damage to both commercial and residential properties. Capable of handling any size loss and working with all types of insurance providers, the LDR disaster team is available 24 hours a day, 365 days per year. For more information, visit www.ldr4service.com or call 1-888-874-7066. Image courtesy of ddpavumba / FreeDigitalPhotos.net How to make a business disaster plan. Free eBook.  


 

What’s Not Covered by Your Homeowner’s Insurance May Surprise You

Wednesday, May 29th, 2013

homeowners insuranceWhen buying a homeowner’s insurance policy, look carefully at the wording -- what you don’t see could end up biting you. Here are four major items to verify with your agent when buying or updating your homeowner’s insurance policy:
  1. Flood Damage. Most homeowner’s insurance policies do not automatically cover damage from what is usually called “surface water.” If you live in a high-risk area, you probably were required by your bank to purchase flood insurance with your homeowner’s policy. But because standard policies are written with the “average” homeowner in mind, you can only get coverage for flood damage if you purchase it separately. If you are not required to purchase flood insurance but live in an area that’s even at moderate risk for flooding, seriously consider adding flood insurance to your homeowner’s policy. The extra insurance could cost you as much as $500 per year, depending on what flood zone your home is in – but compare to a $100,000 loss from flood damage, it’s money well spent.
  2. Motorized vehicles. People might assume that if a car or motorcycle is destroyed while parked in a garage that burns down, the homeowner’s policy automatically covers it. Not so – if a vehicle is used on a roadway, it may not be covered. A four-wheeler that’s not used for home maintenance may not be covered. Your boat might not even be covered. Check with your insurance agent and parse the find print of your policy – if you haven’t already done so. Certain items might be covered under your auto insurance policy, but make sure you know what is covered, and what the coverage is.
  3. Personal items. That $10,000 stamp collection you have tucked away in 14 carefully catalogued albums probably is not covered by your homeowner’s policy -- even if, in general, your personal belongings are. That’s because costly items such as jewelry, firearms and collections typically are subject to sub-limits – a $500 or $1,000 standard limit on coverage within the total amount (say, $100,000 worth) of personal belongings that the policy covers. Check to see which items in your house are subject to those sub-limits. If you want those items covered by insurance, they also need to have a separate policy or rider covering them, for which you pay an extra premium.
  4. Lost items. If a personal item, such as a camera or an expensive purse, is stolen or destroyed in a storm or fire, you are covered for the value for that item above your deductible. However, if you simply lose that item out of forgetfulness, what is sometimes derisively called the “stupidity clause” kicks in. In short, tough luck.
For a rundown of helpful hints, check out this free Consumers’ Guide to Home Insurance from the National Association of Insurance Commissioners. Other helpful websites: Image courtesy of Vichaya Kiatying-Angsulee / FreeDigitalPhotos.net Free eBook shows how to make a home disaster plan  


 

3 Simple Steps to Avoid Water Damage

Tuesday, March 26th, 2013

flood damage repairSpringtime brings more than sunshine and rainbows. It also hits thousands of homeowners every year with water damage – losses that can be prevented with a few simple prevention measures. For starters, make sure that everything around your house that can drain water, does. That means ensuring:
  1. Downspouts are on.
  2. Gutters are clean.
  3. Your yard is sloped away from the house.
  4. Window wells are clear of debris that can cause water buildup.

Two prime prevention measures

After that, homeowners can save themselves a mountain of grief with two prevention measures that can allay a host of problems – checking their sump pumps and turning off their household water supplies during extended trips. Sump pump check. Checking to make sure your sump pump is operating usually means nothing more than pouring a bucket of water into the sump pump well to see if the pump kicks in automatically. If it doesn’t, check the pump’s rod or float to see if it is sticking. If it is, give it a simple jiggle – sump pumps that haven’t run for a year or two sometimes stick from simple underuse. If that doesn’t work, you need a repair or a new pump. Fortunately, a good sump pump will run you only between $150 and $250, depending on the horsepower. And the horsepower does matter. A ¼- or ½-HP sump pumps doesn’t really do the job; a ¾- or 1-HP pump is what you want. “A quarter-horse is a little pump that you’re not really serious about,” says Steve Poyner, vice president and general manager for LDR Construction Services Inc., Rockford, Ill., a provider of cleaning and restoration services for fire and water damage. “Do something that’s going to take care of the job if we get a prolonged rain.” The price difference between a ½-HP and 1-HP pump is negligible – perhaps as low as $100 – compared to the damage suffered in a basement if the pump can’t keep up. Turn off the water. Another simple but underused water damage prevention tool is turning off the water supply to your house before you leave for an extended trip, even two or three days. Poynor says broken refrigerator water lines cause more damage than almost any other culprit. To nix that possibility, just turn off the main water supply, then open up any spigot to relieve the pressure from all the house’s pipes. For wintertime trips, just remember: Keep the heat on, turn the water off. Call in the pros. So what do you do when you take all the right measures, and natural forces like hydrostatic pressure still conspire with a small crack in your foundation to fill your basement with 2 or 3 inches of water? Well, you get some help. For homeowners looking to clean up flood damage or find water damage repair services, calling a service provider like LDR can save quite a few headaches, from not-quite-dry carpets to slogging through insurance company red tape. In the event of water damage, especially in a finished basement with water-absorbing carpet and ceiling tiles, a professional cleaning and restoration company can bring in high-speed fans that blow up to 160 mph, professional-grade dehumidifiers and the testing equipment to make sure that those tools are actually drying out your basement. The service company will also remove damaged articles from the basement, clean them and dry them – all the way down to freeze-drying critical documents and removing individual photos from albums and drying them in a drying chamber. And because insurance companies are the ones actually paying the bills, your professional water damage repair company will act as a liaison to insurance adjusters so that homeowners get what they need and the insurance company gets what it wants. “It’s your house, you hired us; but who’s paying us?” Poynor says. “The insurance companies are paying us because most people don’t have a pocketful of money to pay for it. I know I don’t. You depend on your insurance. You want to play by their rules and you tend to get better results.” Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net Free eBook shows how to make a home disaster plan  


 

9 Things to Know About Your Homeowner’s Insurance

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

homeowners insuranceYour home, your castle, your escape from the world. It’s also, almost certainly, the single largest investment you’ll ever make, by far. Thus your homeowner’s insurance policy is of vital importance, and usually required by the lender. Homeowner’s plans vary, but no matter your neighborhood or locality, sufficient protection includes four components:

Coverage of structure

The most important part of any policy, coverage of structure applies to damage to your home itself from fire, storms, vandalism and other disasters (save exceptions listed below). Protection usually applies to other structures on your property such as a storage shed or detached garage. Insurers typically offer coverage for as little as ten percent of the cost to rebuild. A word to the wise: make sure you have coverage for 100 percent of the cost to rebuild. In the event your home is destroyed, for instance burning to the ground, you’re protected. To determine the right amount of coverage, get an estimate from a builder, or figure it out yourself with the calculator at Building-Cost.net.

Coverage of contents

Most policies will cover the value of your personal belonging from theft or damage due to fire, storms and covered disasters. The typical coverage limit is 50 percent of the coverage value of the structure. So if your rebuilding coverage is $200,000, then your contents coverage can’t exceed $100,000. If you have expensive artwork or other significant valuables, you’ll likely need a separate policy to cover them. To help you determine the replacement value of your home’s contents, make a detailed list of all your belongings – furniture, jewelry, clothing, tools, computers, appliances, electronics and other items of value. A good idea is to take pictures of major belongings and store them in a separate location. Having photos will be a big help when filing replacement claims.

Liability protection

Your policy should also cover any damage to your neighbors’ home, for instance if your son breaks a window with a baseball. This protection extends to personal liability in the event a visitor is injured on your property. They can usually submit any medical bills directly to your insurer. In the event someone files suit, liability coverage pays for legal fees and any court awards, up to your policy limit. Experts recommend at least $300,000 of liability coverage. Most insurers will offer coverage starting at $100,000.

Living expenses reimbursement

In the event you and your family are displaced due to fire or other damage to your home, coverage for living expenses will pay for hotel bills, restaurant tabs, rental cars and other associated costs while repairs are underway. While the huge majority of insurance needs are covered above, it should be noted that most policies do not cover the following:

Flooding

While most policies cover water damage from storms and bursting pipes, as a rule they do not cover damage due to water flowing into the home from rising riverbanks or broken levees and dams. If you live at or near the waterline or in an area at risk of flash floods, you’ll need to get flood insurance provided by the National Flood Insurance Program.

Earthquakes

That’s right, among “acts of god” clauses in most policies, earthquakes are not covered. To cover shakers and tremblers, you’ll need an extra policy. Prices vary widely based on location and age of structure. Deductibles are usually based on a percentage of structure value, rather than a fixed amount.

Trampolines

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, trampoline accidents account for over 90,000 emergency room visits each year. Most insurance companies refuse to cover injuries suffered due to trampolines, and some will refuse coverage altogether if one is on the property.

“Aggressive” dog breeds

Justified or not, most insurers will exclude coverage of injuries due to dog bites from breeds identified as “aggressive,” such as Pit Bulls, protection that would usually apply under most liability policies. These lists comprise breeds with the most reported bites annually and they change each year. News reports and popular culture also are influencers. Dobermans were the feared breed decades ago, verses Rottweilers and “Pitties” today.

War

Whether nuclear, biological or conventional, insurers recognized a long time ago that warfare in any form is uninsurable. However, unless specifically excluded, most policies do cover home damage from acts of terrorism. In fact some states, including Florida, New York, Ohio and Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Texas, prohibit insurers from excluding terrorism. For more information on insurance and other home-related issues, consult the Homeowners’ Resources page at USA.gov. LDR Construction Services, Inc. Cleaning & Restoration has proudly served all of northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin since 1991. LDR specializes in the complete repair of fire, smoke, wind, water and vandalism damage to both commercial and residential properties. Capable of handling any size loss and working with all types of insurance providers, the LDR disaster team is available 24 hours a day, 365 days per year. For more information, visit www.ldr4service.com or call 1-888-874-7066. Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net Download your free home disaster planning eBook  


 

Emergency Preparedness: (Easily) Take a Home Inventory

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

cloud storageCabinets crammed with bank account and credit records. Cardboard boxes stuffed with years of tax statements. Hard drives maxed out with family photos, videos, music and more. In the day-to-day business of life, some stuff needs to be kept within arm’s reach. Other items are rarely used but take up valuable space because they may be needed…someday. If clutter is an issue, one thing is clear: Important paperwork and electronic files should be safeguarded from worst-case scenarios such as fire, flood, theft and the inevitable computer crash. In our free ebook, "Emergency Preparedness: It’s Your Business," one modern option is off-site storage using a Web-based file-hosting service where important information will remain secure, yet easily accessible. Online file storage is rapidly gaining popularity and replacing traditional backup drives, discs and even the trusty ol’ fireproof safe. In fact, Gartner, Inc. (a leading information technology research company) predicts that by 2016, a third of consumers’ digital content will be stored “in the cloud.” Apart from the virtual safekeeping of your records and memorabilia, online file storage serves double duty as insurance home inventory—ideal for speeding up the claim settlement process. The philosophy behind emergency preparedness is to help you get on with life as smoothly as possible, right? So in the event of a disaster such as a fire, for example, providing your adjustor with a handy digital catalog of your belongings makes the whole deal faster, more accurate and infinitely less stressful.

What should be included in a home inventory?

Creating a home inventory involves going through your residence room by room—don’t forget the attic, basement and garage—and making a list of the items of value in each space, their quantity and approximate value. It helps tremendously to dig deep and find a receipt for as many possessions as possible. A suggested checklist includes:
  • Antiques/collectibles
  • Appliances
  • Clothing
  • Electronics
  • Garden tools
  • Hobby supplies
  • Home office furnishings
  • Luxury items: jewelry, china, silver, crystal, furs
  • Sports equipment
  • Power tools
And more... While taking inventory, grab your smart phone and snap a photo of each item because it’s preferred to have a physical checklist plus visual images. Some larger insurance companies provide free, interactive home inventory tools for their clients—just plug in your info and go! Tools are also available for download including Handy Scanner, Google Docs, and iTrackMine, just to scratch the surface. Whatever method you choose, it couldn’t be easier today to create your home inventory and upload it all safely to that big, fluffy storage space in the sky. LDR Construction Services, Inc. Cleaning & Restoration has proudly served all of northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin since 1991. LDR specializes in the complete repair of fire, smoke, wind, water and vandalism damage to both commercial and residential properties. Capable of handling any size loss and working with all types of insurance providers, the LDR disaster team is available 24 hours a day, 365 days per year. For more information, visit www.ldr4service.com or call 1-888-874-7066. Image courtesy of kangshutters / FreeDigitalPhotos.net download the free Emergency Response Plan guide.  


 

Illinois:

Alden, Ashton, Belvidere, Burlington, Byron, Caledonia, Capron, Chemung, Cherry Valley, Dakota, Davis, Davis Junction, DeKalb, Dixon, Durand, Elburn, Forreston, Franklin Grove, Freeport, Garden Prairie, Genoa, Hampshire, Harvard, Hebron, Hillcrest, Hinckley, Huntley, Kingston, Kirkland, Lake Summerset, Leaf River, Lily Lake, Loves Park, Machesney Park, Malta, Maple Park, Marengo, Merideth, Monroe Center, Mt. Morris, New Milford, Oregon, Pecatonica, Poplar Grove, Rochelle, Rock Falls, Rockford, Rockton, Roscoe, Shabbona, South Beloit, Sterling, Steward, Stillman Valley, Sycamore, Waterman, Winnebago, and Woodstock

Wisconsin:

Albany, Albion, Anderson, Beloit, Broadhead, Brooklyn, Cainville, Clinton, Darien, Dayton, Dunkirk, Edgerton, Evansville, Footville, Fort Atkinson, Hanover, Janesville, Milton, Monroe, Monticello, New Glarus, Newark, Orfordville, Ross Crossing, Rutland, Sharon, Stone, Walworth

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